CIVIL WAR

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California State Standards

8.9 Students analyze the early and steady attempts to abolish slavery and to realize the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.

  • Describe the leaders of the movement (e.g., John Quincy Adams and his proposed constitutional amendment, John Brown and the armed resistance, Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, Benjamin Franklin, Theodore Weld, William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass).
  • Discuss the abolition of slavery in early state constitutions.
  • Describe the significance of the Northwest Ordinance in education and in the banning of slavery in new states north of the Ohio River.
  • Discuss the importance of the slavery issue as raised by the annexation of Texas and California’s admission to the union as a free state under the Compromise of 1850.
  • Analyze the significance of the States’ Rights Doctrine, the Missouri Compromise (1820), the Wilmot Proviso (1846), the Compromise of 1850, Henry Clay’s role in the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854), the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision (1857), and the Lincoln-Douglas debates (1858).
  • Describe the lives of free blacks and the laws that limited their freedom and economic opportunities.
  • 8.10 Students analize the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the Civil War.

  • Compare the conflicting interpretations of state and federal authority as emphasized in the speeches and writings of statesmen such as Daniel Webster and John C. Calhoun.
  • Trace the boundaries constituting the North and the South, the geographical differences between the two regions, and the differences between agrarians and industrialists.
  • Identify the constitutional issues posed by the doctrine of nullification and secession and the earliest origins of that doctrine.
  • Discuss Abraham Lincoln’s presidency and his significant writings and speeches and their relationship to the Declaration of Independence, such as his "House Divided" speech (1858), Gettysburg Address (1863), Emancipation Proclamation (1863), and inaugural addresses (1861 and 1865).
  • Study the views and lives of leaders (e.g., Ulysses S. Grant, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee) and soldiers on both sides of the war, including those of black soldiers and regiments.
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Internet Resources

A Day In the Life      Make a Map

 

Teacher Resources

Civil War Traveler      Civil War Interactive      3 Civil War Lessons

NY Times Interactives   Civil War for 5th Graders